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Scotland

This category contains 19 posts

Strome Castle — Scots Roots

Strategically placed on a rocky promontory on the north side of Loch Carron in Wester Ross, Strome Castle was built in the early 1400s as a stronghold for the Lords of the Isles. The castle later became a source of bitter rivalry between the Clan McDonald of Glengarry and the Clan Mackenzie of Kintail. […] via … Continue reading

Iron Age Village, Great Bernera, Outer Hebrides — Scots Roots

A great storm in the winter of 1993 uncovered substantial stonework amongst the sand dunes on the beach at Bostadh on Great Bernera in the Outer Hebrides. The site was excavated in 1996 to reveal a Norse settlement but further digging brought to light an earlier Iron Age village dating from around 500 – 800AD. […] … Continue reading

Burns Night

from liquoricetree January 25th marks the celebration of Scottish poet Robert Burns Born in Ayrshire in 1759, Robert Burns’ work has inspired generation after generation. On January 25th Scots all around the world come together on the anniversary of his birth to honour his memory and celebrate his work. A traditional Burns night consists of … Continue reading

Dun Troddan

Source: Dun Troddan

Kildrummy Castle

Originally posted on Scots Roots:
Kildrummy Castle, in Aberdeenshire, was built in the mid-13th century and became the stronghold of the Earls of Mar. The castle was abandoned in 1716 following the failure of the Jacobite rebellion. Although now in ruins, the remains of its curtain wall, round towers, hall and chapel can still be…

St Maelrubha’s Well, Isle of Skye

Originally posted on Scots Roots:
Beneath the vegetation lies a stone-lined structure into which water flows through a channel from an earlier stone-lined spring. Archaelogical evidence suggests that the site, near Broadford on the Isle of Skye, has been important to local people for more than 10,000 years. A piece of limestone engraved with a…

Linlithgow Palace

Originally posted on Scots Roots:
Situated 15 miles west of Edinburgh, Linlithgow was a royal palace built and developed mainly by the Stewart kings and queens over the 15th and 16th centuries. The palace provided a convenient stopping point on the journey between Edinburgh Castle and Stirling Castle. James V was born at Linlithgow in 1512…

Greyfriars Bobby

Originally posted on Scots Roots:
Not just the star of a Walt Disney film, Greyfriars Bobby was a Skye terrier in 19th century Edinburgh who became famous for guarding his master’s grave for 14 years. His owner was John Gray, a night watchman, who died and was buried in Greyfriars Kirkyard in 1858. Bobby spent…

Skara Brae, Orkney

Originally posted on Scots Roots:
Orkney is a very windy island even today but in 1850 a huge storm uncovered the remains of a prehistoric village near the beach at the Bay of Skaill. The village is remarkably well preserved and has proved to be the best-preserved Neolithic village in western Europe. It is around…

Evening Prayer 6.9.14, First Book of Common Prayer, 1549; St. Columba, Missionary to Scotland, 597

Originally posted on The Daily Office:
The Canaanite woman said, “Yes, Lord, yet even the dogs eat the crumbs that fall from their masters’ table.” The 1637 Book of Common Prayer of the Episcopal Church of Scotland. Archbishop Cranmer’s English Book of 90 years earlier is world-famous for its eloquence, but what made it revolutionary…

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